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Tulane News & Press

  1. Dr. Samantha Francois is one of the dedicated youth advocates who spoke to Gambit Weekly.
  2. Dr. Catherine McKinley, associate professor in the school of social work at Tulane University, has extensively researched issues surrounding Native Americans. She said there are countless studies demonstrating how different forms of racism and discrimination negatively affect mental and social health — a major problem in the Native American community. “Dehumanizing media images have really been used since the beginning of colonization to denigrate native groups,’’ McKinley said. “So this is just a continued form of historical oppression."
  3. A photograph of 15 African-American medical students from Tulane University standing in front of a former Louisiana slave plantation has gone viral. Labat, the student who organized the photograph said "We are descendants of those people. This is our land. We were called there."
  4. The VPI has won a grant from the Pincus Family Foundation to create a Violence Prevention Scholarship which connects graduate students with VPI faculty and community partners! This interdisciplinary program will be based in the Master's of Public Health program, but will integrate faculty from across all schools at Tulane, particularly the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, the School of Medicine and the School of Social Work. Scholars will be immersed in an innovative new training initiative focused on building skills to effectively integrate with community organizations and co-develop programs designed to mitigate the effects of violence and, in the long-term, prevent the intergenerational transmission of violence and its health impacts. The initiative will focus on the lives of children throughout New Orleans, with an emphasis on Central City, and places throughout the city where children are most affected by violence.
  5. Dr. Denese Shervington from the School of Medicine and the Institute of Women and Ethnic Studies testified before the Congressional Committee on Oversight and Reform at the first ever hearing on childhood trauma. Dr. Shervington stressed how the impact of natural disasters and climate change must be factored into how the government addresses childhood trauma. She said, “Children need two things: caretakers to make them feel safe and to know their environment is safe. When Katrina happened, all of that was shattered. Children don’t have the language to talk about how they’re feeling and adults are often dependent on that while they themselves are trying to cope”.
  6. Public health officials grappling with record-high syphilis rates around the nation have pinpointed what appears to be a major risk factor: drug use. Research has shown that people who use drugs are more likely to engage in unsafe sexual behaviors, which put them at higher risk for sexually transmitted diseases. "The addiction takes over," said Dr. Patty Kissinger, an epidemiology professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
  7. The impact of trauma in the lives of New Orleans students has been shown to alter a child’s brain development and other bodily systems, making it difficult for them to learn. In response, the Orleans Parish school board is working to improve support for traumatized students in public schools. Tulane University psychology professor Stacy Overstreet commented that 67 percent of children nationwide have been exposed to an adverse childhood experience.
  8. There are many good health, caregiving, and economic security reasons to endorse the current proposal for paid family leave insurance in Louisiana–Senate Bill 186–as it could greatly benefit women, men, children, families and employers. One important reason is to promote maternal health. About 80% of American women have at least one child, and after giving birth, it is clear that mothers need time for physical recovery, bonding with newborns and emotional health. Since most mothers are employed, it is important for maternity leave to exist — and be paid.
  9. Dr. Thomas LaVeist has an illustrious professional track record researching the nature and causes of racial health disparities and inequities. As the new Dean of the Tulane Public Health School, he sees an opportunity to make a difference in a region that most needs a difference. Dean LaVeist notes that “we’re in a city that has all of the urban health problems of every other big city in this country. We’re in a state that has all of the rural health problems of every other part of rural America. And we’re in the Southeast United States, which is the epicenter for inequities, both historically as well as today.”
  10. In her cross-disciplinary Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Laboratory (BANGL), Dr. Stacy Drury and her colleagues study the relationship between childhood experiences and genetic and epigenetic factors, striving to understand how this shapes a child’s long-term development and health.
  11. The spring, Tulane launched its new Violence Prevention Institute to bring together experts from across campus. Researchers with the Violence Prevention Institute are collaborating across disciplines to understand the causes of violence and how we can best prevent various forms of violence from child maltreatment to intimate partner violence and sexual assault.
  12. Barry Williams walked out of the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola on Thursday free, 41 years after he was convicted at the age of 17 of second-degree murder in a botched robbery that left an elderly woman dead. His attorney of six years, Tulane Criminal Justice Clinic Director Katherine Mattes and student attorneys, had been for years arguing that changes in constitutional law should entitle Williams to be considered for parole.

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