Tulane Home Tulane Home

Tulane News & Press

  1. Dr. Denese Shervington from the School of Medicine and the Institute of Women and Ethnic Studies testified before the Congressional Committee on Oversight and Reform at the first ever hearing on childhood trauma. Dr. Shervington stressed how the impact of natural disasters and climate change must be factored into how the government addresses childhood trauma. She said, “Children need two things: caretakers to make them feel safe and to know their environment is safe. When Katrina happened, all of that was shattered. Children don’t have the language to talk about how they’re feeling and adults are often dependent on that while they themselves are trying to cope”.
  2. Public health officials grappling with record-high syphilis rates around the nation have pinpointed what appears to be a major risk factor: drug use. Research has shown that people who use drugs are more likely to engage in unsafe sexual behaviors, which put them at higher risk for sexually transmitted diseases. "The addiction takes over," said Dr. Patty Kissinger, an epidemiology professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
  3. The impact of trauma in the lives of New Orleans students has been shown to alter a child’s brain development and other bodily systems, making it difficult for them to learn. In response, the Orleans Parish school board is working to improve support for traumatized students in public schools. Tulane University psychology professor Stacy Overstreet commented that 67 percent of children nationwide have been exposed to an adverse childhood experience.
  4. Gretchen Clum of the School of Public Health has been working on numerous projects focused on sexual violence. She evaluated the impact of the 2016 Reading project book “Asking for It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture—and What We Can Do About It” by Kate Harding. “Preliminary results suggest that beliefs in rape myths, which we know are associated with blaming sexual assault survivors, and perpetrating of sexual violence, were reduced after reading the book,” Clum said.
  5. There are many good health, caregiving, and economic security reasons to endorse the current proposal for paid family leave insurance in Louisiana–Senate Bill 186–as it could greatly benefit women, men, children, families and employers. One important reason is to promote maternal health. About 80% of American women have at least one child, and after giving birth, it is clear that mothers need time for physical recovery, bonding with newborns and emotional health. Since most mothers are employed, it is important for maternity leave to exist — and be paid.
  6. On Tuesday, Jan. 22, USG unanimously passed a resolution to submit a comment on behalf of the organization to the U.S. Department of Education on the proposed Title IX regulations. The comment, according to the resolution, would allow USG to voice its concerns about the new regulations’ affect on Tulane students as well as students at other universities.
  7. Dr. Thomas LaVeist has an illustrious professional track record researching the nature and causes of racial health disparities and inequities. As the new Dean of the Tulane Public Health School, he sees an opportunity to make a difference in a region that most needs a difference. Dean LaVeist notes that “we’re in a city that has all of the urban health problems of every other big city in this country. We’re in a state that has all of the rural health problems of every other part of rural America. And we’re in the Southeast United States, which is the epicenter for inequities, both historically as well as today.”
  8. Tulane News provides an in-depth look at recent Tulane initiatives to prevent sexual assault on campus, from the creation of the Wave of Change to the Sexual Assault Task Force to the All In initiative.
  9. Dr. Catherine Burnette, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at Tulane University, says that people generally respond to divorce and their own conflict resolution skills in one of two ways. “They either model their parent’s conflict resolution styles, or they become self-aware and intentional about how they want to navigate conflict in their own relationships,” Burnette says. And sometimes, it’s a mixture of the two. In other words, having divorced parents may enhance a person’s ability to be a judge of character, recognize red flags and choose healthy partners.
  10. Charles Figley, a psychologist and director of the Tulane University Traumatology Institute, says thinking too much about traumatic events, whether it's a refugee crisis on the other side of the world or a school shooting in our own country, can make people too anxious or depressed to function in their daily lives. Figley says, "It's a natural response called compassion fatigue. We of course think about ourselves being in such a place, in which someone would suddenly burst in and shoot things up, but if we think about that too much, then it deteriorates our sense of confidence and our sense of trust and our sense of safety."
  11. The U.S. is the most dangerous nation in the developed world in which to give birth, and Louisiana is among the states with the highest maternal death rates. Dr. Maeve Wallace, a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist and researcher at Tulane's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, has received two grants totaling $2.4 million to study pregnancy-associated mortality to study potential reasons why.
  12. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which represents 64,000 pediatricians, released an updated policy statement that “corporal punishment and harsh verbal abuse may cause a child to be fearful in the short term but does not improve behavior over the long term.” Dr. Cathy Taylor supports this policy and adds, “The goal of discipline is to teach, guide, educate, and reinforce good behavior.” Even further, Dr. Taylor conducted a recent study that found that even indirect exposure to violence during childhood can play a key role in the child developing anti-social and aggressive behavior. Positive parenting strategies can be found on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website.
  13. Tulane researchers conduct 4-year study, "Safe Schools NOLA," on trauma-informed approaches across 5 schools in New Orleans. These approaches include training for teachers to recognize signs of trauma, finding ways to make children feel safe, teaching coping skills and eliminating harsh discipline policies. The Institute for Women and Ethnic Studies, a key community partner for many Tulane researchers, surveyed New Orleans youth over the past several years to learn how deep the mental health issues are stemming from untreated trauma.
  14. March for Our Lives – a student-led organization responding to the Parkland mass shooting – held a panel at Tulane as New Orleans was the group's last stop on the Southern leg of its Road to Change tour, which brought together survivors of the Parkland shooting and local activists and organizers to discuss topics including school-based gun violence prevention strategies and how to push politically for more restrictions on guns. Being conscious of their location, the panelists also turned to the issue of violence in urban environments, especially that which affects young people.
  15. Dr. Burnette has dedicated her career to studying the health disparities of indigenous peoples, examining everything from domestic violence to substance abuse. Her latest article, “Indigenous Women and Professionals’ Proposed Solutions to Prevent Intimate Partner Violence in Tribal Communities,” was selected as the 2018 Best Paper by the Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work.
  16. NOLA LEADs includes a series of six trainings held over three months that focused on helping people develop the skills and knowledge needed to advocate for changes in structural conditions that contribute to health disparities. Much of the program was modeled after the Louisiana Community Health Worker Institute, a program founded and directed by Ashley Wennerstrom (NOLA LEADs co-investigator).
  17. Thomas LaVeist, a national expert on issues related to equity and health, has been named dean of Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He will also hold the position of Presidential Chair in Health Equity, making him the first to hold one of Tulane’s newly endowed presidential chairs, created to support the recruitment of exceptional, internationally recognized scholars whose work transcends and bridges traditional academic disciplines.
  18. The Bedsheet Project will allow students to write on, or even cut, bedsheets with any comments, questions or feelings about sexual violence on campus. The project is spearheaded by the Project IX Dialogue Team. Project IX is a team of students creating initiatives to get students thinking and talking about what consent looks like, to prevent sexual violence at Tulane, and how to build a safer community.
  19. Growing up in an environment plagued by high rates of gun violence can affect someone for the rest of his or her life, according to public-health experts. In the 1990s, the CDC and Kaiser Permanente partnered on a landmark study of more than 17,000 individuals, looking at the connection between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and children's long-term health. The more ACEs someone has—the higher their ACE score—the higher their risk of depression, drug use, and such health problems as diabetes and heart attacks, which disproportionately impact communities of color.

Pages